Internet, Intranet, Extranet? What The F**k?

copyright © 2010 Betsy L. Angert.  BeThink.org

Internet, Intranet, Extranet Defined

Might we delve deeper into the world of technology. The Ethernet, once ethereal now exists in every avenue of our lives.  We have heard the terms; Internet, Intranet, and Extranet.  Might do these mean to us personally and professionally? Perhaps, it is best establish a working definition for each of the platforms.  Countless experts have written on the topic, the features within the various systems, and the variance in use. Steven L. Telleen, Ph.D., Researcher and former analyst with Giga Information Group in Santa Clara, California explains the distinctions most succinctly. In The Difference Between Internet, Intranet, and Extranet Dr. Telleen writes, “Today I think of Intranets, Extranets, and the Web as collections of content. An Intranet is a set of content shared by a well-defined group within a single organization.  An Extranet is a set of content shared by a well-defined group, but one that crosses enterprise boundaries.” In an earlier observation, Telleen, stated, “The Web, in contrast, is an unlimited group.”  In his more recent characterization, that element is unchanged.  He does however, assert, “These terms may continue to evolve in meaning.”  

What is most true, and particularly evident in the Ethernet, change is a constant.

Change and Cyberspace Comes to the Corporate World


Today, in our travel through time and cyberspace, I hope you will appreciate, as I have come to; the study of electricity is analogous to the Ethernet.  Each validates the notion transformations are invisible to the human eye.  Turn a switch on or off and things happen.  Instantaneously, it would seem, if a toggle were moved in one direction the room is filled with light.  In another position, darkness pervades. An engine starts or stops.  Press the power switch on your computer, or click on your Internet browser, and the world (world-wide-web) opens up and lets you in.  We do not necessarily see what occurs; nay understand it.  Yet, our personal universe is altered.  

In commerce and cyberspace, change occurs in every moment.  Internet, Intranet, and Extranet conversions occur all around us and metamorphosis surrounds us.  Whether or not we are aware of these evolutions, the progression will affect us.  Indeed, it has.  Please consider your own corporation and communications within.  Electronic mails are ubiquitous.  Employees in your office likely scan, share, and collaborate on files.  Most companies have a website.  More have begun to acknowledge what is inescapable in modern-day societies, Facebook directs more online users than Google.

“Marketers must focus on social marketing in addition to traditional search, as customers have a multi-pronged way of finding information,” said Jeremiah Owyang, a Web strategist for the Altimeter Group, a San Mateo consulting firm with clients like Gigya. Mister Owyang went on to state, “The clear-cut channels of yesteryear are now an intricate set of connections.”  

As we all understand and live, presently, many of us “Go to Meeting” from the comfort of our homes, clothed in pajamas or jeans.  We “do lunch” at cyberspace cafés.  We talk through text or instant messages.  Colleagues in cubicles separated only by a few feet feel no need to leave their desks to make a statement, or request a file. Office workers prefer to send an electronic mail message.  

Communication through cyberspace is easier and effortless.  Yet, regardless of how we try to communicate a tone, the reader will interpret the essence through his or her own emotional reaction and respond accordingly.  Thus, the reality lives.  People relate to those they know personally, trust explicitly, and are friendly with, even if only on facebook.

This is the reason for the rise in Internet interactions.  The World-Wide-Web is a constant conversation unlike the Marketing monologue most businesses offer.  TurboTax has realized the strength of relationships off and by extension online.  This big business decided to dive more deeply into what reaps abundant dollars.

One of Gigya’s clients is financial software maker Intuit Inc. Seth Greenberg, Intuit’s director of national media and digital marketing, said the company is betting on social media to draw customers to its TurboTax Web site this year. The tax preparation program generates about $1 billion in revenue in the 10 to 15 weeks leading to April 15.

Half of TurboTax’s 20 million users are on Facebook and each has an average of 150 friends. Intuit is using social media to generate more buzz about the program through the sharing of product reviews and answers to tax preparation questions.

Greenberg coined the phrase “friend-casting” to describe how Intuit is using social media.

“We actually want our customers to be our best sales force, not us,” Greenberg said. “Enabling our 20 million-customer base to be a word-of-mouth army for us is much more interesting.”

Any of us might recognize as Mister Greenberg has: friends, family, and familiars talk. What someone we know says speaks volumes.  A recommendation, a referral, the thought that Mom, Dad, brother or sister might reject the services of a particular company because any of these individuals had a very bad experience, weighs heavily on the minds of corporate Executives.  Tycoons understand the tonnage known as brand awareness and appeal.

Weight of Brand Awareness, Brand Appeal, and the Affect in the World-Wide-Web


Moguls are mindful of the fact that each of us, in every walk of life is affected by the assessments others make.  No organization is exempt from public scrutiny.  Just as mothers and father search to find the best babysitter, our parents also model the need to evaluate a butcher, a baker, and a candlestick maker. Countless caregivers, before a baby begins to walk, will work to ensure that their child goes to the most celebrated school.  

An education company, a for-profit, public, or private institution must be concerned with what the customer base thinks.  Reputation is everything if a business expects to increase earnings, sustain salaries, and preserve profits.

Tycoons only need to imagine the influence of college graduates, parents, professional persons ages 35 to 54, who as of January 2009 represented a 276% growth rate amongst facebook users.  This percentage has doubled in a mere two-month period.

Moms and Dads, Grandmas and Grandpas, guardians, and even we, as individuals, prepare our progeny and ourselves for the finest education.  Our careers capture our attention from the time we are first asked, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” We wish to pursue the best and be the best from birth.  This is the reason that private schools test 4 and five year olds before an application to a prestigious program is accepted. The vast numbers who work to be Valedictorians speaks to the truth; be it for a business or a business school, a religious institution or an industry that works with private and religious school Educators, public opinions matter.

Hence, within a very short period of time, businesses, en masse, have built blogss.  Chief Executive Officers have also chosen to submit their thoughts words and muses.  Facebook and other “fun” and well-followed forums have served to expand Executives’ awareness.  Perhaps, this is why today, tycoons envision investments in Internet, Intranet, and, or Extranet applications.  Undeniably, the Industrial Revolution evolved into the Information Age and brick and mortar business have become far more mobile.  Today, we meet and greet our clientele through electronic mediums.

How did this happen?  Almost invisibly, advancements began behind closed doors.  The concept of global connectivity was first born in the August 1962.  It was not until 1972 three years after the formation of ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network), a branch of the United States Department of Defense, that a research team successfully fashioned a computer-to-computer chat

By 1994, very little had changed with the exception of a report, entitled “Realizing The Information Future: The Internet and Beyond.” This document served as a draft for what would become the information superhighway. In April 1995, a true evolution occurred.

NSF’s privatization policy was terminated. The NSFNET Backbone was declared defunded.  Delphi followed by other commercial networks moved in.  Today, we are all connected constantly. If you doubt this, look at the numbers, as well as the reality you live.  Microsoft Corporation certainly has.

Who is online?  What do users do? How might Businesses Benefit?


A web-based company, YouTube, which in 2008 was only three years old, received 13 hours of uploaded video every minute!  Now, at the ripe old age of five, YouTube has 24 hours of video uploaded every minute!  In two short years, the number of uploads has nearly doubled.

In 2008, The Washington Post noted, “The site logs hundreds of millions of views a week.”  Can we begin to imagine how many people are online at YouTube at any given moment now that the site has grown even more popular?  Probably not.  Nor would most companies be able to comprehend the earning potential.  Nevertheless, what each of us likely know is that we have viewed a YouTube video or two.  Perchance, you saw one last evening on the news.  Indeed, you may have sent a tweet that said, “Wait until you see . . .” From January 2009 to February of the same year, in one month, Twitter grew 1382 percent!  

People of every age tweet.  Fastest Growing Demographic; women Over 55.  Men between 45 and 54 are not far behind.  Essentially, Facebook is Your Father’s (and Mother’s) Social Network. Still, neither may be your online home.

Perhaps, you are not amongst the 3 to 4 million that in 2008 used social network technology.  You may not include yourself in the later and greater groundswell of social media growth that occurred in 2009.  You possibly could not comprehend as Forrester Research reported in the Fall of that year, Number of Social Networking Users Has Doubled Since 2007.  

Indeed, this veracity has inspired Microsoft to integrate Social Media into its latest release.  In February 2010, banner headlines read, Microsoft adds social networking to Outlook.

The mammoth technology company has read the reports.  Microsoft moguls have acknowledged, businesses must think Tribalization.  They have tried and failed time and time again,  However, Microsoft has finally concluded they must fuse, or infuse the future into their business model.  Observers are reminded of the past; Microsoft came late to the Internet party.

Perhaps, you too, or your company’s Executives, might wish to evaluate the evidence Microsoft moguls appraised.  You may choose to be amongst the movers and shakers such as Bill Gates, who admittedly, ultimately realized, in what might have been one of those moments of verbalized frustration; it is wise to examine the energy that is electricity and the Ethernet.  

People-centricity, which more recently has become Microsoft’s mission, seems to have been born out of a recognition followed by abundant research.  President Gates’ insight might have been as my own.  Upon further investigation into Internet, Intranet, and Extranet applications, I had to acknowledge that one or each of these platforms are popular, preferable, and even, surprisingly, profitable.  After a quick scan of the statistics Microsoft’s most senior Chief Executive could have concluded as I did in an earlier time.  the question I most needed to ask was “What the F**K is Social Media?”

The answer, I believe lies in what was before and Only “One Year Later.” The Ethernet is electric.  To be effective, any Internet, Intranet, and Extranet system must honor the veracity visible in the numbers.  Please ponder the presentations.

Please stay tuned, or tune in again.  The next treatise on this topic will further examine the once unimaginable.  The Ethernet, just as electricity, is the essential element that moves modern-day civilizations, commerce and citizens worldwide.

References for Internet, Intranet, Extranet realities . . .

Republicans Twitter. Jindal Rebuttal; A Tweet



Bobby Jindal’s Rebuttal to President Barack Obama’s Address to Congress PT1

copyright © 2009 Betsy L. Angert.  BeThink.org

The new President of the United States addressed a joint session of Congress for the first time, on February 24, 2009.  Republicans were all a twitter.  Grand Old Party Legislators, thumbs and fingers in flight, sent text messages to their constituents while Barack Obama stood before the nation and its leaders.  Senators and Representatives from the Right were careful not to have their hands seen on camera.  The persons elected to represent the people preferred to obfuscate the truth; they cared not what the Commander-In-Chief might say.  As they anxiously awaited the voice of Grand Old Party, Governor Bobby Jindal, the person who would offer the Republican rebuttal, those on the right of the aisle refused to listen.

Conservatives considered the speech as the regulations they lifted on bankers long ago, unnecessary.  Those on the right thought Barack Obama’s words as taxes.  Text messages stated the Republican sentiment, “Give us a break.”

We need to bring transparency to Washington, D.C., so we can rid our capital of corruption  . . . .

Indeed, a break is what Americans have.  The affluent have loopholes that enable them to break away from laws that require them to pay the tariff that supports society.  Big businesses have lobbyists to do their bidding.  Bankers have supplicants who regularly speak with members of Congress.  Petitioners helped convince policymakers corruption is but the culture of depositories.  Bailout will be beneficial.  In this country, without funds for the greater good, for schools, roads, bridges, research, and development, we have a fractured system.

Republicans and Democrats, at least in government, are also divided.  The people, each of whom is poorer by the day, yearn for help.  They will do the work, if only someone gives them a chance.  Common folk request few dollars.  They ask only for the cash they paid in taxes.  The money was meant to support society, to help provide jobs for the little people.  Average Americans only want to work.  No one welcomes a handout.  The people’s desire is to acquire the dollars they need to buy goods.  

Citizens understand that none of us is here alone.  United we will stand.  Divided we fall.  Americans experience, with Republicans unwilling to consider the greater good, the commonweal, the United States has become a weakened nation.  Yet, in the confutation to the President’s address, Governor Bobby Jindal, of Louisiana presented the traditional divisive wisdom.

We oppose the national Democratic view that says the way to strengthen our country is to increase dependence on government. We believe the way to strengthen our country is to restrain spending in Washington, to empower individuals and small businesses to grow our economy and create jobs.

If only that had been the way when the Republicans ruled.  However, instead of money doled out in moderation, mountains of cash were poured into protracted wars.  Bills that approved bridges to nowhere were popular and well-funded for districts represented by corrupt Conservative Congresspersons.  Then there is the issue of the train.  Bobby Jindal mentioned it again in his refutation of President Obama’s official oration.  This scandal is surely the Democrats doing . . . except it never was.

In recent days, Fox News hosts and contributors Steve Doocy, Brian Kilmeade, Newt Gingrich, Trace Gallagher, and Charles Krauthammer have advanced the false claim — pushed by Republican lawmakers — that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) included a provision in the economic recovery law directing that $8 billion in funds be spent on a high-speed rail line between Southern California and Las Vegas. In fact, the bill does not direct high-speed rail funds to any specific project, and any funding would be allocated by Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, a former Republican congressman.

The bill states that $8 billion shall remain available for the “Secretary of Transportation” for “projects that support the development of intercity high speed rail service” and that the secretary shall “submit to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations a strategic plan that describes how the Secretary will use the funding provided under this heading to improve and deploy high speed passenger rail systems.” The Joint Explanatory Statement of the Conference Report on H.R. 1 further states of the high-speed rail program: “The conferees have provided the Secretary flexibility in allocating resources between the programs to advance the goal of deploying intercity high speed rail systems in the United States.”

Perhaps, this saga is as the story of Sheriff Harry Lee, the Jefferson Parish law officer who Jindal said is a friend of his.  In his address to Americans, Governor Jindal recounted the day he entered the Sheriff Harry Lee’s office.  The Republican lawmaker said to an expectant American television audience, “I had never seen him so angry. He was literally yelling into the phone.”

“Well, I’m the sheriff, and if you don’t like it, you can come and arrest me.” I asked him, “Sheriff, what’s got you so mad?” Jindal then explained Harry Lee had invited volunteers to come with their boats.  These persons were needed “to rescue people who were trapped on their rooftops by the floodwaters.”

Governor Jindal continued, “The boats were all lined up and ready to go. And then some bureaucrat showed up and told him they couldn’t go out in the water unless they had proof of insurance and registration.”

“Sheriff, that’s ridiculous,” said Bobby Jindal on that strange day not so long ago.  The lesson, the Governor shared, is the one Harry espoused during the emergency, “Ignore the bureaucrats.”  Perchance, the people of this country, a nation in crisis, would be better served if they paid no heed to the bureaucrat who told this tale.

The anecdote that the Governor shared, some say, never occurred.  No record that the two men met in person seems to exist.  The only other person, besides the Louisiana Governor, who might verify the narrative cannot speak. No one can inquire of the late Harry Lee, is the story true.  The “Democrat” known to rule “his vast domain in the suburbs for decades while proudly consorting with mobsters and infuriating the city at his doorstep with pronouncements about black criminality,” passed in October 2007.

Such is the state of a broken Union.  Republicans in Congress remain all a twitter.  Grand Old Party loyalists thought the Governor in Baton Rouge delivered a rebuttal speech that was but a tweet, The words of Barack Obama, well, we can only wonder, if those who wish to obstruct and obfuscate will be the obstacle to a genuine recovery.

Clues may come, or these may be apparent in the text, not seen on blackberry screens.  Please peruse the transcript of Bobby Jinal’s speech, in total.  One never knows what they may find hidden from the camera’s view.



Bobby Jindal’s Rebuttal to President Barack Obama’s Address to Congress. PT2


February 24, 2009

Transcript

The New York Times

The Republican Response by Gov. Bobby Jindal

Following is a transcript of Gov. Bobby Jindal’s remarks on behalf of the Republican Party on Tuesday night, responding to President Obama’s address, as recorded by CQ Transcriptions:

Jindal: Good evening, and happy Mardi Gras. I’m Bobby Jindal, governor of Louisiana.

Tonight, we’ve witnessed a great moment in the history of our republic. In the very chamber where Congress once voted to abolish slavery, our first African-American president stepped forward to address the state of our union.

With his speech tonight, the president completed a redemptive journey that took our nation from Independence Hall to Gettysburg to the lunch counter and now finally the Oval Office.

Regardless of party, all Americans are moved by the president’s personal story, the son of an American mother and a Kenyan father who grew up to become leader of the free world.

Like the president’s father, my own parents came to this country from a distant land. When they arrived in Baton Rouge, my mother was already four-and-a-half-months pregnant. I was what folks in the insurance industry now call a pre-existing condition.

Jindal: To find work, my dad picked up the yellow pages and started calling local businesses. Even after landing a job, he still couldn’t afford to pay for my delivery, so he worked out an installment plan with the doctor. Fortunately for me, he never missed a payment.

As I grew up, my mom and dad taught me the values that attracted them to this country, and they instilled in me an immigrant’s wonder at the greatness of America.

As I — as a child, I remember going to the grocery store with my dad. Growing up in India, he had seen extreme poverty. As we walked through the aisles, looking at the endless variety on the shelves, he would tell me, “Bobby, Americans can do anything.”

I still believe that to this day: Americans can do anything. When we pull together, there’s no challenge we can’t overcome.

As the president made clear this evening, we’re now in a time of challenge. Many of you listening tonight have lost jobs; others have seen your college and your retirement savings dwindle. Many of you are worried about losing your health care and your homes. You’re looking to your elected leaders in Washington for solutions.

Republicans are ready to work with the new president to provide these solutions. Here in my state of Louisiana, we don’t care what party you belong to if you have good ideas to make life better for our people. We need more of that attitude from both Democrats and Republicans in our nation’s capital.

All of us want our economy to recover and our nation to prosper. So where we agree, Republicans must be the president’s strongest partners. And where we disagree, Republicans have a responsibility to be candid and offer better ideas for a path forward.

Today in Washington, some are promising that government will rescue us from the economic storms raging all around us. Those of us who lived through Hurricane Katrina, we have our doubts.

Let me tell you a story. During Katrina, I visited Sheriff Harry Lee, a Democrat and a good friend of mine. When I walk into his makeshift office, I had never seen him so angry. He was literally yelling into the phone. “Well, I’m the sheriff, and if you don’t like it, you can come and arrest me.” I asked him, “Sheriff, what’s got you so mad?” He told me that he put out a call for volunteers to come with their boats to rescue people who were trapped on their rooftops by the floodwaters. The boats were all lined up and ready to go. And then some bureaucrat showed up and told him they couldn’t go out in the water unless they had proof of insurance and registration.

And I told him, “Sheriff, that’s ridiculous.” Before I knew it, he was yelling in the phone. “Congressman Jindal’s here, and he says you can come and arrest him, too.” Well, Harry just told those boaters ignore the bureaucrats and go start rescuing people.

There’s a lesson in this experience: The strength of America is not found in our government. It is found in the compassionate hearts and the enterprising spirit of our citizens.

We’re grateful for the support we’ve received from across the nation for our ongoing recovery efforts. This spirit got Louisiana through the hurricanes, and this spirit will get our nation through the storms we face today.

To solve our current problems, Washington must lead. But the way to lead is not to raise taxes, not to just put more money and power in the hands of Washington politicians. The way to lead is by empowering you, the American people, because we believe that Americans can do anything.

That’s why Republicans put forward plans to create jobs by lowering income tax rates for working families, cutting taxes for small businesses, strengthening incentives for businesses to invest in new equipment and to hire new workers, and stabilizing home values by creating a new tax credit for homebuyers. These plans would cost less and create more jobs.

But Democratic leaders in Congress, they rejected this approach. Instead of trusting us to make decisions with our own money, they passed the largest government spending bill in history, with a price tag of more than $1 trillion with interest.

While some of the projects in the bill make sense, their legislation is larded with wasteful spending. It includes $300 million to buy new cars for the government, $8 billion for high-speed rail projects, such as a magnetic levitation line from Las Vegas to Disneyland (NYSE:DCQ) (NYSE:DIS) , and $140 million for something called volcano monitoring.

Instead of monitoring volcanoes, what Congress should be monitoring is the eruption of spending in Washington, D.C.

Democratic leaders say their legislation will grow the economy. What it will do is grow the government, increase our taxes down the line, and saddle future generations with debt.

Jindal: Who amongst us would ask our children for a loan so we could spend money we do not have on things we do — we do not need? That is precisely what the Democrats in Congress just did. It’s irresponsible. And it’s no way to strengthen our economy, create jobs, or build a prosperous future for our children.

In Louisiana, we took a different approach. Since I became governor, we cut more than 250 earmarks from our state budget. To create jobs for our citizens, we cut taxes six times, including the largest income tax cut in the history of our state. We passed those tax cuts with bipartisan majorities.

Republicans and Democrats put aside their differences. We worked together to make sure our people could keep more of what they earn. If it can be done in Baton Rouge, surely it can be done in Washington, D.C.

To strengthen our economy, we need urgent action to keep energy prices down. All of us remember what it felt like to pay $4 at the pump. And unless we act now, those prices will return.

To stop that from happening, we need to increase conservation, increase energy efficiency, increase the use of alternative and renewable fuels, increase our use of nuclear power, and increase drilling for oil and gas here at home.

We believe that Americans can do anything. And if we unleash the innovative spirit of our citizens, we can achieve energy independence.

To strengthen our economy, we also need to address the crisis in health care. Republicans believe in a simple principle: No American should have to worry about losing their health care coverage, period. We stand for universal access to affordable health care coverage.

What we oppose is universal government-run health care. Health care decisions should be made by doctors and patients, not by government bureaucrats.

We believe Americans can do anything. And if we put aside partisan politics and work together, we can make our system of private medicine affordable and accessible for every one of our citizens.

To strengthen our economy, we also need to make sure that every child in America gets the best possible education. After Hurricane Katrina, we reinvented the New Orleans school system, opening dozens of new charter schools and creating a new scholarship program that is giving parents the chance to send their children to private or parochial schools of their choice.

We believe that with the proper education the children of America can do anything. And it shouldn’t take a devastating storm to bring this kind of innovation to education in our country.

To strengthen our economy, we must promote confidence in America by ensuring ours is the most ethical and transparent system in the world. In my home state, there used to be saying: At any given time, half of Louisiana was said to be half underwater and the other half under indictment.

Nobody says that anymore. Last year, we passed some of the strongest ethics laws in the nation. And today, Louisiana has turned her back on the corruption of the past.

We need to bring transparency to Washington, D.C., so we can rid our capital of corruption and ensure that we never see the passage of another trillion-dollar spending bill that Congress hasn’t even read and the American people haven’t even seen.

As we take these steps, we must remember, for all of our troubles at home, dangerous enemies still seek our destruction. Now is no time to dismantle the defenses that have protected this country for hundreds of years or to make deep cuts in funding for our troops.

America’s fighting men and women can do anything. If we give them the resources they need, they will stay on the offensive, defeat our enemies, and protect us from harm.

In all these areas, Republicans want to work with President Obama. We appreciate his message of hope, but sometimes it seems like we look for hope in different places.

Democratic leaders in Washington, they place their hope in the federal government. We place our hope in you, the American people.

In the end, it comes down to an honest and fundamental disagreement about the proper role of government. We oppose the national Democratic view that says the way to strengthen our country is to increase dependence on government. We believe the way to strengthen our country is to restrain spending in Washington, to empower individuals and small businesses to grow our economy and create jobs.

In recent years, these distinctions in philosophy became less clear. Our party got away from its principles. You elected Republicans to champion limited government, fiscal discipline, and personal responsibility.

Instead, Republicans went along with earmarks and big government spending in Washington. Republicans lost your trust, and rightly so.

Tonight, on behalf of our leaders in Congress and my fellow Republican governors, I say this: Our party is determined to regain your trust. We will do so by standing up for the principles that we share, the principles you elected us to fight for, the principles that built this in the greatest, most prosperous country on Earth.

You know, a few weeks ago, the president warned that our country is facing a crisis that he said, in quotes, “we may not be able to reverse.” You know, our troubles are real, to be sure, but don’t let anyone tell you that we cannot recover. Don’t let anyone tell you that America’s best days are behind her.

This is the nation that cast off the scourge of slavery, overcame the Great Depression, prevailed in two World Wars, won the struggle for civil rights, defeated the Soviet menace, and responded with determined courage to the attacks of September 11, 2001.

The American spirit has triumphed over almost every form of adversity known to man, and the American spirit will triumph again.

We can have confidence in our future because, amid all of today’s challenges, we also count many blessings. We have the most innovative citizens, the most abundant resources, the most resilient economy, the most powerful military, and the freest political system in the history of the world.

My fellow citizens, never forget: We are Americans. And like my dad said years ago, Americans can do anything.

Thank you for listening. God bless you. God bless Louisiana. And God bless America.

Copyright 2009 The New York Times Company

References for a perceived reality . . .